Ambassadors

We have chosen some inspiring women in the Hong Kong community to be our ambassadors. Meet them below!

 

 Stephanie Cuvelier

  

 

Brief Intro about yourself

Mixed culture kid hailing from Belgian & Chinese parents. Born and bred in HK, educated in Hong Kong and Australia, but continually learning through online study & life experiences. I suppose you could say I’m an avid sportsperson who is passionate about living a healthy and happy life, sharing the knowledge I pick up along the way with everyone around me.

What do you like about being an athlete?

The constant challenges it puts your mind and body to. Not only does it push your body’s limits, but it also tests your mental grit and character. Sport in general can throw curveballs in your direction every step of the way, but it’s always about how you choose to deal with the situations a hand which define you as a person. There are so many lessons that can be taken from sport and I truly think it has been one of my life’s greatest teachers.

Favorite place to workout in HK?

At the calibrate studio 🙂

What’s your spirit animal and why?

Apparently a dolphin 🐬 … because I did a buzzfeed quiz once and that’s the result I got 🤓 In all seriousness, apparently it represents harmony and balance.

From what I understand, dolphins are instinctual creatures,  and also represent a symbol of protection and resurrection. Those who identify with dolphins are typically peaceful and gentle, but with a deep inner strength.

I can definitely identify with the statement about dolphins being playful in nature, reminding people to approach life with humor and joy! Life is too short not to have fun and take things one step and a time, but also making wise decisions to plan for the future as well.

How do you usually start your day?

If I’m being 100% honest… I actually click snooze once, roll in bed for another 5 minutes before I give myself a big stretch and then physically get out of bed. Typically I start my morning with a hot yoga session or a morning walk if I can’t fit a class in. After this I feel energized and ready to start my work day!

Best post – workout fuel? 

I love my eggs, so I’m either having boiled eggs with a green smoothie(banana, spinach, chia seeds & almond milk or coconut water), or I’ll head out to grab a veggie packed omelette out in a nearby restaurant (most likely Wagyu Lounge or Mr.Wolf).

Who inspires you?

My parents have always been my role models. As much as families may have moments of bickering from time to time, I can’t even begin to express my gratitude for everything they have achieved and been able to provide for my 3 sisters and I.

Everyone has their own story to tell, but being able to see it and experience the byproducts of it – as opposed to being told a story – is something else. My parents come from very different cultural backgrounds and yet they have been able to find harmony amongst their different upbringings. The core values that I have learned to live by come from their teaching and guidance, along with the opportunities and experiences they’ve given us. I hope that I can do them proud by implementing what I have learnt from them, and I wish that one day I’ll be able to be as successful as them!

What’s your take on the women’s fitness industry, is it going in the right direction?

I do believe it is heading in the right direction, but it’s nowhere near the end of its growth. Females are standing up for themselves more than ever, breaking barriers both on and off the fitness grounds. Health is finally being prioritized (for the most part) and people are beginning to embrace strong bodies as opposed to what society deems to be aesthetically pleasing. It’s amazing to be a part of this generation, to witness and be a part of this history in the making.

What do you think is the biggest misconception about female athletes or women that do sport?

I think the most obvious one to me is the stereotypes that are linked with particular sports. I used to get it all the time when people found out I play rugby, responses such as “you’re not big enough to be a rugby player” or something along the lines of “shouldn’t all rugby players super butch” etc. Sure, each sport may have their stereotypes for a reason, but often it would boil down to the aesthetic presentation of the individual as opposed to a genuine interest in the athlete and their talent.

I guess this links heavily with the big misconception that women just can’t perform in sports as well as men can, because females are inferior to men in terms of strength and speed. I’m not saying that we are playing on a level playing field, because in very simple terms, we often differ in something very obvious… size! It simply cannot be stated that all men are stronger or faster than all women, because there is a great overlap in the strength and speed of males and females. If we were to compare the relative strength of two individuals of a similar training background, I believe it could definitely be comparable (taking into consideration their genetic differences too of course).

Are you a meal person or a snack person?

If I had the choice I would be a meal person, but because of my work schedule I often fall into the trap of being a snack person. A big part of this is my own doing though, so I am working on structuring my client schedule a little better to make time for meals rather than snacks!

What’s your best health advice to women?

Understand your genetics / family history and create a lifestyle for yourself that will prevent you from developing any chronic issues, as opposed to work towards “fixing” your problems later down the line.

Take care of yourself.

Eat well, move regularly, and never underestimate the power of sleep and recovery.

If you could put one thing on a billboard what would it be?

Good health is the best wealth one can ask for: take care of your body because you have only got one to live in!

 

Kimberley Carder

   

 

Brief intro about yourself:

A Hong Kong native currently in my final year of my PsyD Clinical Psychology degree while also pursuing athletic dreams of being a jiu-jitsu world champion.

What is your best result in a competition?

In 2015 I won the first women’s professional MMA fight in Hong Kong. I was the unsuspecting underdog who won by unanimous decision.

What do you like about being athlete?

How it has completely changed my relationship with my body and fostered an understanding of the connection between body and mind. I am much more in tune to knowing what my body needs and how my mind can facilitate that need and vice versa. On days where I am not feeling so positive, I know I need to go for a run, lift something heavy or go for a jiu-jitsu cuddle (and by cuddle I mean get smashed by a training partner).

Being an athlete has also changed my relationship with my body in the sense that I now see my body as a tool (a weapon of mass destruction on a good day). My body has functionality and purpose, so how could I start to shame it for the extra pounds it carries? That negative self-talk has really changed the more connected I am to my athleticism.

Favorite place to workout in HK?

Espada. When you train jiu jitsu, your gym becomes your second home. It’s a tight-knit community. I am there daily either throwing around some kettlebells or being thrown around by my team mates.

What’s your spirit animal and why?

Depends on the day to be honest! When I am in my work and competition zone, I am a panther, the most underrated of the cat family – no fancy prints or buffoonery that people put on their shoes and handbags but a lethal predator that gets the job done. When I’m at home, I’m a panda.

How do you usually start your day?

On days when I do early morning training I take a cordyceps supplement, it’s a mushroom supplement that wakes me up, creates a sense of alertness and gets my body ready for action.

Best post – workout fuel?

Other than a high-5? Some simple protein and carbs.

What would you consider your hardest challenge in life so far?

I had to make a conscious decision right after my MMA fight if I wanted to pursue fighting professionally and take on other fight offers that were coming my way at the time. It was an incredibly tough decision to make, do I continue down my current path of academia or take on this completely unconventional path of fighting full-time? I won’t do into a whole load of details but I did a lot of weighing the pros and cons, as well as long term career planning for both options. Living with the decision has had some tough days even now. Scheduling my own training hours every week now for jiujitsu, while also reminding myself that I consciously chose studying as a priority is a tough internal battle I continue to go through!

Who inspires you?

I am continually inspired by most people I meet. I am fortunate to have an elite breed of female friends who are goal-setting, determined individuals who remind me that there’s always more gas in the tank and power in our wolfpack to dig-deep and keep achieving my goals. My training partners at 6am who are mostly fathers who need to get a few more hours in their day so they can spend time with their children in the evening, so they sacrifice sleep. My jiujitsu professor, Rodrigo Caporal who works and teaches with so much passion and kindness.

What’s your take on the women’s fitness industry, is it going in the right

direction?

I believe as long as there are more and more women getting in touch with their bodies as tools of function, it is a positive movement. When the relationship with the body becomes that of shaming and not being “enough” we start so see bigger systemic issues but that is a larger societal issue. There’s a lot of misinformation circulating the internet, but now more than ever there are a lot of informed people too. As long as we don’t get seduced by sexy instagrammers who sell false promises we should all be okay!

What do you think is the biggest misconception about female athletes or women

that do sport?

That they’re superhuman with no flaws. I think the fall of Ronda Rousey really highlighted the humanity in sport and that it is a big game, sometimes you’re in front and other times you’re behind. You need to be brave, face failure and not let it define you.

Are you a meal person or a snack person?

Both!

What’s your best health advice to women?

Your body is the greatest science experiment you’re given. Try different things for a couple of weeks and be committed to the programming – see what your body responds to optimally. Consistency is key, so when you love the sport/exercise component and the meal plan – you will get the results you want!

If you could put one thing on a billboard what would it be?

Listen more, speak less.

 

Samantha Morphy

  

Brief Intro about yourself

I am a free spirited Californian. Recently moved to HK, I love traveling and my job as a personal trainer. I continue to learn and better myself while trying to help others. I have over 5 years experience in designing and monitoring exercise programs based on client needs, goals, abilities, and anatomy. Motivating people to be the best versions of themselves is what I love waking up to do everyday. I don’t think there’s anyone who always feels perfect about his or her body, but I’ve found that when I feel STRONG, my confidence skyrockets.

What do you like about being athlete?

I love the challenge!

Favorite place to workout in HK?

Ursus Fitness, I love the classes and the coaches are always motivating you to push your limits!

What’s your spirit animal and why?

When I’m not at work or working out, I’m truly a Sloth, very chill and laid back!

How do you usually start your day?

I love starting my day with hot water and Lemon. I’m usually up by 6am every morning.

Best post – workout fuel?

I love my Amazing Grass Protein Superfood! I mix this protein with spinach, kale, chia seeds, frozen cauliflower, half a banana, tablespoon MCT Oil, so yummy! Followed by egg whites, chicken, and avocado!

Who inspires you?

Seeing people who face constant daily challenges, struggles and pain and still approaching life with a big smile on their face and living their life to the best of their capabilities, is what inspires me the most.

What’s your take on the women’s fitness industry, is it going in the right direction?

Women are RULING the fitness industry! The women’s fitness industry is moving in a positive and healthy direction. I think its super important that the WFI is moving away from something you do in order to look a certain way into something you do for the sheer joy of it. Strong is the new skinny.

What do you think is the biggest misconception about female athletes or women that do sport?

Girls become masculine if they participate in sports.

Strength, speed and reaction time are important in sports. Masculine and feminine stereotypes usually associate strength with males and weakness with females. All of us need to be strong. We all benefit from being confident, having high self-esteem. Being skilled at sports makes us feel good whether we are male or female.

Are you a meal person or a snack person?

I’m both! I track my Macros to maintain a healthy lifestyle!

What’s your best health advice to women?

Make time to move! Exercise ups endorphins, boosts immunity, relieves stress, and keeps you feeling strong and confident in your body.

Eat Real Food: Choosing real, whole, all-natural clean foods just makes sense if you are serious about your health and happiness.

Drink Water: sip on plenty of water all day to keep energy levels up and soaring.

If you could put one thing on a billboard what would it be?

Own who you are!

 

 

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If you know somebody who is doing amazing things and would like to recommend them as an ambassador please email us! info@womensfive.com